6"/35 (15.2 cm) Pattern 1877
152 mm/35 (6") Pattern 1877
Updated 12 August 2012

The original design of this gun was by the Russian designer Brink in 1882.  The barrel was made with a single tube on which 5 rows of rings were attached along with ashroud, connecting ring and mounting ring.  The breech was the Trell de Bolue piston type.  The first 18 guns were finished in 1887 and installed on the Black Sea battleships.

In 1885 technology for making wire wound guns was purchased from England and in 1887 a wire-wound version of the 6"/35 (15.2 cm) gun was made.  This had slight differences from the original gun and had a single tube with slightly larger fastening rings.  Ten of these guns were made and installed on battleship Imperator Nikolay I and gunboats Otvazhny and Grozyaschii.  35 more guns were ordered, but in 1890 the order was replaced by guns made from two tubes of fastened type.  The first of these guns was made in 1892.  However, due to the development of the 6"/45 (15.2 cm) Pattern 1892, this order was cut to 18 guns.

In 1904-05 nine guns of this type were installed on Amur River barges to defend against the possibility of a Japanese invasion.  After the war the guns were removed and put back in storage.  In 1913, 14 of the remaining 6"/35 (15.2 cm) guns were turned over to the army to be installed in the Sveaborg fortress, where one of them survives to this day.

Actual bore diameter was 152.4 mm (6.0").


6"/35 (15.2 cm) Pattern 1877
Note powder canister and bare feet


6"/35 (15.2 cm) in casemate mounting
The built-up construction of this weapon is clearly evident in this sketch

Gun Characteristics
Designation 6"/35 (15.2 cm) Pattern 1877
152 mm/35 (6") Pattern 1877
Ship Class Used On Battleships:  Ekaterina II, Georgy Pobedonosets, Imperator Alexandr II, Gangut, Dvenadstat' Apostolov and Navarin classes

Cruisers:  Admiral Nakhimov, Admiral Kornilov and Pamiat' Azova

Coastal Defense Ships:  Kreml' (after rearmament),  Pervenets (after rearmament),  Ne Tron' Menya (after rearmament)

Gunboats:  Koreets and Grozyaschii classes

Date Of Design 1882
Date In Service 1885
Gun Weight Brinke (Fastened type):  6.3 tons (6.4 mt)
Wire wound type:  5.0 tons (5.1 mt)
Wire wound twin tube type:  4.8 tons (4.9 mt)
Gun Length oa 209.45 in (5.320 m)
Bore Length N/A
Rifling Length N/A
Grooves 36
Lands N/A
Twist N/A
Chamber Volume N/A
Rate Of Fire 1 round per minute
Type N/A
Projectile Types and Weights "Heavy" - 119 to 123.5 lb.s (54 - 56 kg)
"Light" - 91.5 lbs. (41.5 kg)
Bursting Charge N/A
Projectile Length "Heavy" - 3.6 calibers
"Light" - 3 to 3.5 calibers
Propellant Charge 50.48 lbs. (22.9 kg) of brown gunpowder
Muzzle Velocity "Heavy" - 1896 fps (578 mps)
"Light" - 2329 fps (710 mps)
Working Pressure N/A
Approximate Barrel Life N/A
Ammunition stowage per gun Gangut - 100 rounds
Others - N/A
Elevation With "Light" 41.5 kg shell
Range @ 12 degrees 8,170 yards (7,470 m)
Range @ 15.23 degrees 9,610 yards (8,780 m)
Mount / Turret Data
Designation Single open mounts
   Admiral Kornilov
   Koreets class gunboats 
   Grozyaschii class gunboats
   River Craft (during Russo-Japanese War)

Single casemate mounts
   Ekaterina II class
   Georgy Pobedonosets class
   Imperator Alexandr II class
   Dvenadstat' Apostolov
   Admiral Nakhimov
   Admiral Kornilov
   Pamiat' Azova
   Ne Tron' Menya

Weight Open mounts:  10.2 to 10.4 tons (10.3 to 10.5 mt)
Casemate mounts:  10.2 to 10.5 tons (10.3 to 10.6 mt)
Elevation Open mounts:  -7 / +20 degrees
Casemate mounts:  -8 / +12 degrees
Rate of Elevation Open mounts:  2 degrees per second
Casemate mounts:  0.86 degrees per second
Train 180 degrees
Rate of Train Open mounts:  4.5 degrees per second
Casemate mounts:  3.2 to 3.75 degrees per second
Gun Recoil All:  28 in (71 cm)
Loading Angle N/A
Data from
"The Battle of Tsu-Shima" articles by John Campbell in "Warship Volume II"
"The Battleship Gangut" by L.I. Amirkhanov and A.V. Lukoshkov
"Morskaya Artilleriya Rossiyskogo Flota 1867-1922" (Naval Artillery of the Russian Fleet 1867-1922) and "Entsiklopedia Otechestvennoi Artillerii" (Encyclopedia of Fatherland [Russian] Artillery) both by A.V. Shirokorad
"Flot vo Slavu Rossii" (Fleet in Honor of Russia) CD
Special help from Vladimir Yakubov
Page History

11 September 2006 - Benchmark
12 August 2012 - Updated to latest template