Britain
4.7"/45 (12 cm) QF Marks IX and XII
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4.7"/45 (12 cm) Vickers "E"
Pictures

Updated 13 March 2016


WNBR_47-45_mk9_Imperial_pic.jpg

HMS Imperial in 1937
One of the many British destroyers built during the 1930s with 4.7"/45 (12 cm) Mark IX guns
These are CPXVIII mountings which allowed elevations of +40 degrees


WNBR_47-45_mk9_Breech_pic.jpg

4.7"/45 (12 cm) Mark IX gun in CPXVIII mounting
This mounting was used on the pre-war H and I classes and on most war-emergency destroyer classes
In this picture, the projectile and cartridge case are in the loading tray, ready for ramming.  The rammer man (not in picture) would then haul on the "T" handle, visible at the lower left side of the loading tray, to move the projectile and cartridge case into the breech after which the the tray worker would push the loading tray over to get it out of the path of the recoiling gun.  After the gun fired and ejected the empty case, the tray worker lowered the loading tray and reset the rammer head by pulling it back to the rear of the loading tray.
The net laying on top of the counterweight normally hung down so as to slow the ejected cartridge case.
MoD Photograph


WNBR_47-45_mk9_Ursa_pic.jpg

HMS Ursa in February 1946
This ship carried the last and best 4.7"/45 (12 cm) single mounting, the CPXXII
Note the raked-back front shield, which was designed to allow higher elevations than those on earlier mountings such as the CPXVIII above
Photograph from Allan C. Green collection of glass negatives
State Library of Victoria Image Image H91.108/2192


WNBR_47-45_mk9_mk22_pic.jpg

4.7"/45 (12 cm) Mounting Mark CPXXII
Note the differences between this late-war mounting and the pre-war Mark CPXVIII shown above.  Although this mounting has major improvements over the earlier one, the difficulty in working this gun at or near its maximum elevation of 55 degrees is apparent.

The tray worker is leaning over the fuze-setting machine, used for AA projectiles.  The loading tray operation was automatic, but this required very careful adjustment in order to ensure that the rammer head tripped at the proper time.  This mounting was nearly identical to the ones used for the 4.5 in (11.4 cm) Mark IV guns and they shared the same maintenance manual.



WNBR_47-45_mk9_mk22_side_pic.jpg

Another view of the Mark CPXXII showing a round in the loading tray
Note ammunition being taken from a ready locker and the crewman adjusting the AA fuze setter
IWM Photograph A 15896


WNBR_47-45_mk9_Napier_pic.jpg

HMS Napier in November 1945
4.7"/45 (12 cm) Mark XII guns in Mark XIX mountings
Photograph from Allan C. Green collection of glass negatives
State Library of Victoria Image Image H91.250/1348


WNBR_47-45_mk9_Napier_fwd_pic.jpg

Closer view of the forward 4.7"/45 (12 cm) Mark XII guns on HMS Napier in November 1945
Photograph from Allan C. Green collection of glass negatives
State Library of Victoria Image Image H91.250/1344


WNBR_47-45_mk9_Casings_pic.jpg

4.7"/45 (12 cm) guncrew on HMCS Algonquin cleaning up their 4.7"/45 (12 cm) Mark XII guns after firing at the Normandy Beaches on 7 June 1944
Note that the crewman kneeling in the rear is holding a 4.7" (12 cm) projectile
Library and Archives Canada Photograph MIKAN no. 3223884


WNBR_47-45_mk9_Jackal_pic.jpg

Right hand 4.7"/45 Mark XII gun on HMS Jackal in 1940
The round has been rammed, the loading tray moved to the firing position and now the breech worker appears to be pushing on the cartridge case.  This weapon had a semi-automatic breech mechanism which would partially close when the cartridge case rim hit the ejectors and then fully close when the loading tray was raised, so I am not certain what the breech worker is doing here.  It is possible that the cartridge case did not fully seat and thus prevented the breech block from closing.
IWM photograph A 346


WNBR_47-45_mk9_Tray_pic.jpg

Detail of Loading Tray for CP XVIII Mounting
Note the Rammer Handle and Balance Weight
Sketch from The Gunnery Pocket Book, B.R. 224/45 (1945)
Used here by permission of Historic Naval Ships Association


WNBR_47-45_mk9_CP_Mounting_pic.jpg

CPXVIII Mounting
Click on this sketch for a larger image
Sketch from The Gunnery Pocket Book, B.R. 224/45 (1945)
Used here by permission of Historic Naval Ships Association


WNBR_47-45_mk9_sap_pic.jpg

British 4.7" (12 cm) SAP Projectile
Image courtesy of Steve Johnson of Cyberheritage



WNBR_47-45_mk9_starshell_pic.jpg

Starshell for 4.7" (12 cm) guns
Picture courtesy of Bob Henneman
All the World's Battlecruisers


WNBR_47-45_mk9_San_Luis_pic.jpg

Argentine Destroyer San Luis, a Buenos Aires Class Destroyer


WNBR_47-45_mk9_front_pic.jpg

4.7" gun from Argentine Buenos Aires Class Destroyer
Photograph copyrighted by Georg v. Rauch and used here by his kind permission


WNBR_47-45_mk9_rear_pic.jpg

4.7" gun from Argentine Buenos Aires Class Destroyer
Counterweight is missing from this gun
Photograph copyrighted by Georg v. Rauch and used here by his kind permission


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Off-Site Resources

Images at The Vickers Photographic Archive

For the Mark IX:  4.7 Mark VIII, Single Mark XIII quarter and XXII
Notes:  "Mark VIII" is a misprint, the mountings shown here were actually Mark CPXVIII

For the Mark XII:  4.7 XIX
Although identified as 4.7" (12 cm) guns, photographs 4797 and 5853 at the Vickers Archives are actually of 4.5" (11.4 cm) twin mounts

For the "wet-mount" 4.7" (12 cm) Mark IX guns used on submarines:  Thames deck gun.

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Images at Australian War Memorial

112243, 112244, 301076, P00444.206

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Page History

19 October 2008 - Benchmark
29 August 2011 - Added picture of guncrew on HMCS Algonquin
15 December 2011 - Added picture of HMS Imperial
16 June 2012 - Added pictures of HMS Ursa and HMS Napier
15 December 2013 - Added photograph of CPXXII with ready locker
25 May 2014 - Fixed broken links to images at the Australian War Memorial
01 December 2015 - Changed Vickers Photographic Archive links to point at Wayback Archive
13 March 2016 - Added photograph of HMS Jackal and moved pictures of Mark E to their own datapage